Which if any philosophers might be considered affiliated with Wittgenstein’s school of thought or have expressed similar views?

What is philosophy according to Wittgenstein?

Conception of Philosophy. Wittgenstein’s view of what philosophy is, or should be, changed little over his life. In the Tractatus he says at 4.111 that “philosophy is not one of the natural sciences,” and at 4.112 “Philosophy aims at the logical clarification of thoughts.” Philosophy is not descriptive but elucidatory.

What was the main idea of Wittgenstein’s philosophy?

Two general themes dominate the Tractatus. First is the nature of representation, the relation between thought, language, and reality, and the limits of thought and representation. Second is the nature of logic and logical truth. The two are intimately interwoven, since logic is conceived to be a condition of sense.

What was Ludwig Wittgenstein contribution to philosophy?

Wittgenstein made a major contribution to conversations on language, logic and metaphysics, but also ethics, the way that we should live in the world. He published two important books: the Tractatus Logico Philosophicus (1921) and the Philosophical Investigations (1953), for which he is best known.

Was Wittgenstein a continental philosopher?

In order to understand continental philosophy, one has to refer indirectly to analytic philosophy, which originated in Germany and Austria through the work of Gottlob Frege (1848–1925) and the Austrian-born British philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889–1951), its most famous representative.

Who is Socrates philosophy?

Socrates (/ˈsɒkrətiːz/; Greek: Σωκράτης; c. 470–399 BC) was a Greek philosopher from Athens who is credited as the founder of Western philosophy and among the first moral philosophers of the ethical tradition of thought.

Was Ludwig Wittgenstein a logical positivist?

Logical Positivism was a theory developed in the 1920s by the ‘Vienna Circle’, a group of philosophers centred (unsurprisingly) in Vienna. Its formulation was entirely driven by Wittgenstein’s Tractatus, which dominated analytical philosophy in the 1920s and 30s.

What did Wittgenstein teach?

They were regularly made to work well beyond the standards for their ages, especially in math: Wittgenstein taught algebra and geometry to all of his elementary students. Some excelled and loved him.

What is one conclusion that Wittgenstein in his later philosophy comes to?

Wittgenstein’s later philosophy represents a complete repudiation of the notion of an ideal language. Nothing can be achieved by the attempt to construct one, he believed. There is no direct or infallible foundation of meaning for an ideal language to make transparent.

Was Wittgenstein an empiricist?

In some respects Wittgenstein made significant breaks with the empiricist tradition, especially in his views about language and the explanation of the rigour of the deductive sciences. His treatment of the relationship between mental events and physical events also represents an important departure.

What was Plato’s philosophy?

In metaphysics Plato envisioned a systematic, rational treatment of the forms and their interrelations, starting with the most fundamental among them (the Good, or the One); in ethics and moral psychology he developed the view that the good life requires not just a certain kind of knowledge (as Socrates had suggested)

What did Aristotle believe?

Aristotle’s philosophy stresses biology, instead of mathematics like Plato. He believed the world was made up of individuals (substances) occurring in fixed natural kinds (species). Each individual has built-in patterns of development, which help it grow toward becoming a fully developed individual of its kind.

What was Aristotle’s philosophy?

In his metaphysics, he claims that there must be a separate and unchanging being that is the source of all other beings. In his ethics, he holds that it is only by becoming excellent that one could achieve eudaimonia, a sort of happiness or blessedness that constitutes the best kind of human life.

Who founded logical positivism?

“Logical positivism” is the name given in 1931 by A. E. Blumberg and Herbert Feigl to a set of philosophical ideas put forward by the Vienna circle.

Who was the founder of positivism?

Auguste Comte

Auguste Comte (1798–1857) is the founder of positivism, a philosophical and political movement which enjoyed a very wide diffusion in the second half of the nineteenth century.

Which one of the following philosopher is an ardent supporter of logical positivism?

The basic source for this school of thought is the later writings of the Viennese-born philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein, followed by the contributions of John Langshaw Austin, Gilbert Ryle, John Wisdom, G.E. Moore, and other British philosophers.

Who Below advocated positivism?

The positivist theory of knowledge, as proposed by Mach and Avenarius, impressed many scholars, most notable among whom was probably the leading British logician and philosopher Bertrand Russell in one of the earlier phases of his thought.

Who is known for his promotion of logical positivism?

Sir Alfred Jules (“Freddie”) Ayer (better known as Alfred Ayer or A. J. Ayer) (1910 – 1989) was a 20th Century British philosopher in the Analytic Philosophy tradition, mainly known for his promotion of Logical Positivism and for popularizing the movement’s ideas in Britain.

Is AJ Ayer a logical positivist?

Sir A.J. Ayer, in full Sir Alfred Jules Ayer, (born October 29, 1910, London, England—died June 27, 1989, London), British philosopher and educator and a leading representative of logical positivism through his widely read work Language, Truth, and Logic (1936).

What is philosophy according to Ayer?

Philosophical ideas. In Language, Truth and Logic (1936), Ayer presents the verification principle as the only valid basis for philosophy. Unless logical or empirical verification is possible, statements like “God exists” or “charity is good” are not true or untrue but meaningless, and may thus be excluded or ignored.

What did Ayer believe?

Ethics. The emotivism espoused by Ayer in LTL was supported by his belief in the distinction between fact and value. Given, he thought, that there were no moral facts to be known, there could be no verification of such facts, and so moral utterances could have no cognitive significance.