What was Nietzsche’s Position on Darwin and his theory of Evolution by Natural Selection?

Nietzsche had assumed that the outcome of Darwinian evolution could only account for the success of inferior (weak and mediocre) forms of life simply in terms of sheer numbers, e.g., the ubiquitous viruses, bacteria, insects and fishes.

What did Nietzsche think of Darwin?

For Nietzsche, Darwin’s theory is false because it is too intellectual, because it searches for rules, regulations, and uniformity in a realm where none of these are to be found – and, moreover, where they should not be found. Such a reading goes furthest toward making Nietzsche’s criticism substantive and relevant.

How does Nietzsche distinguish his view from Darwin’s?

The central motif in Nietzsche’s criticism of Darwin seems to be that Darwin lays too much stress on survival, and too little on power [18]. But in offering this criticism, Nietzsche “misidentifies the selective criterion in Darwinism,” which is not survival, but reproduction.

What was Nietzsche’s theory?

Nietzsche claimed the exemplary human being must craft his/her own identity through self-realization and do so without relying on anything transcending that life—such as God or a soul.

What were the main points of Nietzsche’s philosophy?

Master morality and slave morality

Nietzsche argued that two types of morality existed: a master morality that springs actively from the “nobleman”, and a slave morality that develops reactively within the weak man. These two moralities do not present simple inversions of one another.

What are Nietzsche’s three most important ideas?

NIETZSCHE: The Eternal Recurrence

In Nietzsche’s book Thus Spoke Zarathustra, there are three major teachings Zarathustra has to offer: the Will to Power, the conception of the Eternal Recurrence and the advocacy of the Overman.