Suppose you have an argument with false premises and a false conclusion. Given this information, what do you know about the validity of this argument?

Suppose you have an argument with false premises and a false conclusion. Given this information, what do you know about the validity of this argument? The argument may be either valid or invalid. Explanation: If an argument has false premises and a false conclusion, then the argument may be either valid or invalid.

Can a valid argument have a false premise and a false conclusion?

A valid argument can have false premises; and it can have a false conclusion. But if a valid argument has all true premises, then it must have a true conclusion.

Can an argument with a false conclusion be valid?

FALSE: A valid argument must have a true conclusion only if all of the premises are true. So it is possible for a valid argument to have a false conclusion as long as at least one premise is false.

What is an argument with false premises and false conclusion?

So, an argument with a mixture of true and false premises is still considered to be an argument with false premises–it is false that all of the premises are true. Nevertheless, in these examples, the conclusion is false. For either example, the logic is invalid and the premises are false. Here the conclusion is false.

What is an example of a valid argument with a false conclusion?

If Elizabeth Taylor is president of the United States, then Elizabeth Taylor must be younger than 35. Elizabeth Taylor is president of the United States. So, Elizabeth Taylor must be younger than 35. For either example, the logic is valid but the premises are false.

What can we say for sure about an argument with all true premises and a false conclusion?

If an argument is unsound and the conclusion is false, the argument may still have true premises. In fact, if we have an argument with true premises and a false conclusion, then we know that the argument is invalid (and unsound). If an argument is valid and it has false premises, then it must have a false conclusion.

How is it that a valid argument can have a false premise and a true conclusion?

Validity is a guarantee of a true conclusion when the premises are true but offers no guarantee when the premises are false. False premises can lead to either a true or a false conclusion even in a valid argument. In these examples, luck rather than logic led to the true conclusion.

What is an argument with false premises?

A false premise is an incorrect proposition that forms the basis of an argument or syllogism. Since the premise (proposition, or assumption) is not correct, the conclusion drawn may be in error. However, the logical validity of an argument is a function of its internal consistency, not the truth value of its premises.

What is an example of a false premises?

Examples of false premises
An example of a false premise is “all swans are white”, which can appear, for instance, in a logically unsound argument such as “all swans are white, so if an animal is black then it isn’t a swan”.

What do you call an argument that has false premises?

A false premise is an untrue proposition that forms part of the basis of a logical syllogism. Since the premise (assumption) is not correct, the conclusion drawn may also be wrong. However, it should be noted that whether or not an argument is “valid” does not depend on whether its premises are true.

What logical conclusion can you draw about an argument that is valid but has a false conclusion?

A valid argument had false premises must have a false conclusion,it is impossible that ones have false premises and a true conclusion. What logical conclusion can you draw about an argument that is valid but has a false conclusion? This argument must have at lease one false premise.

Can an argument with all true premises and a true conclusion be invalid?

Invalidity is a no guarantee of a true conclusion when the premises are true. True premises can lead to either a true or a false conclusion in an invalid argument. In these examples, luck rather than logic led to the true conclusion.

How can you determine whether the argument is truthful or not what are the necessary considerations?

You need to find a credible scenario in which the premises are true and the conclusion false. If you can’t do that, then the argument is strong and you move on to inspect the truth of the premises. If all premises are true or backed up by good sub-arguments. Then the argument is cogent and therefore good.

When it is improbable that the conclusion be false given that the premises are true it is an example of?

Section 1.3 defined an inductive argument as one incorporating the claim that it is improbable that the conclusion be false given that the premises are true. If this claim is true, the argument is said to be strong.

What is inductive and deductive?

Inductive reasoning is a bottom-up approach, while deductive reasoning is top-down. Inductive reasoning takes you from the specific to the general, while in deductive reasoning, you make inferences by going from general premises to specific conclusions.

What deductive means?

Definition of deductive
1 : of, relating to, or provable by deriving conclusions by reasoning : of, relating to, or provable by deduction (see deduction sense 2a) deductive principles. 2 : employing deduction in reasoning conclusions based on deductive logic.

When an argument claims that the truth of its premises guarantees the truth of its conclusion it involves Which inference?

There are two basic kinds of arguments. Deductive argument: involves the claim that the truth of its premises guarantees the truth of its conclusion; the terms valid and invalid are used to characterize deductive arguments.

Which type of argument makes the claim that the conclusion is supported by its premises conclusively?

deductive argument

A deductive argument claims that its conclusion is supported by its premises conclusively. A deductive argument is valid when, if its premises are true, its conclusion must be true.

When an argument is valid and its premises are true the argument is called?

More specifically, we ask whether the argument is either deductively valid or inductively strong. A deductive argument is an argument that is intended by the arguer to be deductively valid, that is, to provide a guarantee of the truth of the conclusion provided that the argument’s premises are true.