Are infinities in physics (or in any other materalist philosophy) actually possible?

Is the concept of infinity possible?

Although the concept of infinity has a mathematical basis, we have yet to perform an experiment that yields an infinite result. Even in maths, the idea that something could have no limit is paradoxical. For example, there is no largest counting number nor is there a biggest odd or even number.
Mar 3, 2016

Are there infinities in physics?

In physics one might look for infinities in space, time, divisibility, or dimensionality. Although some have speculated that three-dimensional space is infinite, cosmologists generally believe that the universe is curved in such a way as to make it finite but unbounded—akin to the surface of a sphere.

Is infinity real or theoretical?

In the context of a number system, in which “infinity” would mean something one can treat like a number. In this context, infinity does not exist.
Sep 1, 1997

Is there infinity in real life?

Actual infinity does not exist. What we call infinite is only the endless possibility of creating new objects no matter how many exist already. ” H. Poincar e (1854-1912). “Every infinity is potential.” Aristotle (384 BC – 322 BC) “Actual infinity exists” Geprge Cantor (1845-1918) It is a very controversial question.

Is time infinite in philosophy?

Temporal finitism is the doctrine that time is finite in the past. The philosophy of Aristotle, expressed in such works as his Physics, held that although space was finite, with only void existing beyond the outermost sphere of the heavens, time was infinite.

Why infinity is not possible?

Potential infinity is never complete: elements can be always added, but never infinitely many. “For generally the infinite has this mode of existence: one thing is always being taken after another, and each thing that is taken is always finite, but always different.” — Aristotle, Physics, book 3, chapter 6.

Is infinity a paradox?

The paradox arises from one of the most mind-bending concepts in math: infinity. Infinity feels like a number, yet it doesn’t behave like one. You can add or subtract any finite number to infinity and the result is still the same infinity you started with. But that doesn’t mean all infinities are created equal.
Aug 26, 2021

Is infinite regress possible?

The mere existence of an infinite regress by itself is not a proof for anything. So in addition to connecting the theory to a recursive principle paired with a triggering condition, the argument has to show in which way the resulting regress is vicious.

Who created infinity?

mathematician John Wallis

infinity, the concept of something that is unlimited, endless, without bound. The common symbol for infinity, ∞, was invented by the English mathematician John Wallis in 1655. Three main types of infinity may be distinguished: the mathematical, the physical, and the metaphysical.

How did Ramanujan found infinity?

Who knew an unlucky number for Hardy would be the rub of green Ramanujan needed. The man who knew infinity was called so because his love for mathematics had no boundaries. He gave the whole mathematics fraternity a new dimension and left behind useful conclusions which are being used as a base for new findings.
Dec 21, 2020

Can Infinity Stones be used in other universes?

Since the time stone worked in the dark dimension which is stated to be a different universe and to be apart of the multiverse this means all of the MCU infinity stones work outside their home universe.

Did the Greeks understand infinity?

Early Greek
The earliest recorded idea of infinity in Greece may be that of Anaximander (c. 610 – c. 546 BC) a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher. He used the word apeiron, which means “unbounded”, “indefinite”, and perhaps can be translated as “infinite”.

Who claimed that reality is the infinite or the apeiron?

Anaximander

Anaximander is said to have identified it with “the Boundless” or “the Unlimited” (Greek: “apeiron,” that is, “that which has no boundaries”).

What is the origin of infinity?

Infinity has its own special symbol: ∞. The symbol, sometimes called the lemniscate, was introduced by clergyman and mathematician John Wallis in 1655. The word “lemniscate” comes from the Latin word lemniscus, which means “ribbon,” while the word “infinity” comes from the Latin word infinitas, which means “boundless.”
Feb 22, 2018