Ad baculum fallacy: is there a distinction between a direct threat and an appeal to an external one?

What is baculum fallacy?

Argumentum ad baculum (Latin for “argument to the cudgel” or “appeal to the stick”) is the fallacy committed when one makes an appeal to force to bring about the acceptance of a conclusion.

What is ad baculum fallacy examples?

The speaker is foretelling that something bad will happen to the listener, but is not threatening to be the cause of that harm. Examples: “It’s bedtime. Give me any sass about it, and you’ll get a spanking!”

How do you define the fallacy of appeal to force?

The “appeal to force” fallacy is a rhetorical fallacy that relies on force or intimidation (scare tactics) to persuade an audience to accept a proposition or take a particular course of action.

Which of the following fallacy uses threat?

Argumentum ad Baculum (fear of force): the fallacy committed when one appeals to force or the threat of force to bring about the acceptance of a conclusion.

How do you say argumentum ad baculum?


Argumento malva colom argumento malva colom argumento malva colom algún antro malva colom.

What type of argument where force coercion or the threat of force is given as a justification for a conclusion?

Appeal to Force (Argumentum Ad Baculum or the “Might-Makes-Right” Fallacy): This argument uses force, the threat of force, or some other unpleasant backlash to make the audience accept a conclusion.

What is the difference between appeal to force and attacking the person?

APPEAL TO FORCE (ad baculum ): using threats of harm instead of good evidence and sound reasoning to gain agreement. ARGUMENT AGAINST THE PERSON (ad hominem ): attacking the character or background of the person making an argument instead of responding to that person’s claim, evidence, and reasoning.

Is a fallacy that make physical or psychological threats to those who do not accept it?

Appeal to Force



The fallacy occurs whenever the arguer presents a threat under the pretense of defending a conclusion. Premises that threaten are not relevant to the truth of the conclusion. Threat must occur in the context of an argument. Threats may involve physical or psychological harm.

What is ad Misericordiam fallacy?

Appeal to Pity (Ad Misericordiam) Description: The argument attempts to persuade by provoking irrelevant feelings of sympathy. Examples: “You should not find the defendant guilty of murder, since it would break his poor mother’s heart to see him sent to jail.”

What is an example of appeal to force?

Appeal to Force Examples



Before a track meet, your friend says to you, ‘If you don’t let me win the race, I can’t be your friend anymore. Letting me win the race makes sense, don’t you think?’

What are some examples of Appeal to authority?

Instead of presenting actual evidence, the argument just relies on the credibility of the “authority.” Examples of Appeal to Authority: 1. A commercial claims that a specific brand of cereal is the best way to start the day because athlete Michael Jordan says that it is what he eats every day for breakfast.

Is also called appeal to force?

Appeal to force is one type of logical fallacy in which someone uses force or a threat of force to gain acceptance for their argument or position. Rather than appealing to intellect, it fallaciously seeks compliance by evoking fear and anxiety. it would have, rather than looking at the actual merits of the argument.

What are the three main classifications of fallacies?

In other potentially persuasive arguments, the premises give no rational grounds for accepting the conclusion. These defective forms of argument are called fallacies. fallacies are correspondingly classified as (1) material, (2) verbal, and (3) formal.

What are the three fallacies?

Species of Fallacious Arguments. The common fallacies are usefully divided into three categories: Fallacies of Relevance, Fallacies of Unacceptable Premises, and Formal Fallacies. Many of these fallacies have Latin names, perhaps because medieval philosophers were particularly interested in informal logic.

What are the 5 different fallacies?

Let us consider five of the most common informal logical fallacies—arguments that may sound convincing but actually rely on a flaw in logic.

  • (1) Red Herring Fallacy. …
  • (2) Strawman Fallacy. …
  • (3) Slippery Slope Fallacy. …
  • (4) Begging the Question Fallacy. …
  • (5) Post Hoc Fallacy.


What are the two types of fallacies?

There are two main types of fallacies:

  • A formal fallacy is an argument with a premise and conclusion that doesn’t hold up to scrutiny.
  • An informal fallacy is an error in the form, content, or context of the argument.


How many fallacies are there?

There are three commonly recognized versions of the fallacy. The abusive ad hominem fallacy involves saying that someone’s view should not be accepted because they have some unfavorable property.

What are the 8 logical fallacies?

Table of Contents

  • Correlation Is Not Causation.
  • Slippery Slope Fallacy.
  • False Dichotomies.
  • Begging the Question.
  • Red Herrings.
  • Appeals to the Bandwagon, Authority, and Pity.
  • Ad Hominem.
  • Straw Man.


What is the most commonly used fallacy?

The ad hominem is one of the most common logical fallacies. While it can take many forms — from name calling and insults, to attacking a person’s character, to questioning their motives, to calling them hypocrites — any argument that targets the source, rather than the argument, is an ad hominem.